Financial help

If the long-term effects of broken bones have left you unable to work, there may be financial support available for you.

If you’re not sure how the state benefit system works, it's natural to put off applying for the help you’re entitled to. There are several types of financial support available for older people, and people with disabilities.

Am I entitled to benefits?

Benefits are awarded based on how a condition affects you, not on a diagnosis itself.

Osteoporosis itself doesn’t cause any pain or symptoms, so doesn’t automatically qualify as a disability.

If you’re experiencing persistent pain, a change in posture or problems getting around because of broken bones, you may be entitled to benefits.

The support available

You can find full details of the kind of support that is available on the GOV.UK website.

The following organisations can also talk you through your options, and help with your application:

Applying for benefits

If you think you’re entitled to any benefit, request the paperwork as soon as possible. Even if you don’t submit the application immediately, many benefits can be backdated to the date you were sent the form.

Make sure you don’t underplay your problems. Give examples and as much detail as possible about how the long-term impact of broken bones affects your daily life. This helps the assessor understand what support you need.

Some of the application forms are long and might take you a while to fill in. Ask someone to help if you get stuck, or phone the relevant ‘how to claim’ helpline, which can offer guidance. If you need to call someone, remember to have your National Insurance number and bank details handy to help answer any questions.

You can for more information on the financial support available to you in our financial help after fracture factsheet.